Asian Americans continue to be invisible.

October 24th, 2011

But this time, their identities were replaced.

A recent Citi credit card commercial shows three non-Asian men launched a balloon with a camera tied to its end.  The camera was to take pictures of the earth from above. Like many typical commercials, it is less than 60 seconds long and to sell an idea–that Citi credit card is convenient for purchase.

What consumers may not be aware of is that two of the three men in the ad were actually Chinese Americans students from MIT.  Two years ago, Oliver Yeh and Justin Lee did a science project and made international news. Their inexpensive project was published by the Guardian in U.K.

There is nothing wrong with Citi’s advertisement to market its credit card, but when Citi replaced the Asian men who own the original idea with White men, what is Citi saying?

Let me know what you think?

Isn’t he a Chinese? His last name is Lee.

October 3rd, 2011

Can we assume one’s ancestry by his or her last name?  Let me know what you think.

Do you speak Asian?

September 21st, 2011

Is there an Asian language? An Asian culture?

What do you think?

Chopsticks anyone?

August 29th, 2011

Do all Asians that live in Asia use chopsticks?  Do all people of Asian heritage use chopsticks?  What do you think?

Using nouns vs. verbs

August 21st, 2011

If I give you three pictures.  One shows a rooster, one has a cow, and the third one is a picture of grassland.  Which two would you group together?

There is no right or wrong answer, but the answer reveals how one thinks?

What is your answer?

A handshake that leads to a head-shake.

August 13th, 2011

In the US, many of us shake hands on a daily basis.  If you don’t take notice of how others shake hands, you may want to start paying attention to how you shake others’ hands.

When you give a palm-to-palm, one-two-three, and up-and-down firm handshake, you presents a positive image because this is the US cultural norm in professional handshakes.  When this occurs, the other person makes a mental note: “What a strong firm handshake!  Trustworthy.”

Now what if you give an unusual firm handshake?  In fact, it is so firm that  you can sense from the other person’s facial expression that reads, “Hey.  Go easy.”  Do you promptly apologize, but soon forget about it?   Or do you wonder whether the other person may think of your behavior as offensive and interpret that very firm handshake as aggressive; hence becomes hesitant to do business with you?

Finally  what about giving a soft-to-the-touch handshake?   Have you thought that such “dead fish handshake” may come across as detached? Or worse, someone with a weak personality.

How we shake hands depends, in part, on where we grew up.  If you grow up in Asia or South America, you tend to give a less than strong  handshake  because you were told that it is aggressive to give a strong shake hands.  Yet a less than firm handshake is not valued in this country.  What are you going to do next time when you shake someone’s hand?

Let me know what you think!

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